Friday, December 14, 2012

Antifreeze Danger

As the weather gets colder, pets may seek shelter in garages or sheds while they’re outside. It’s important to make sure that all dangerous chemicals are stored out of your pet’s reach. Antifreeze especially poses a dangerous threat to pets. If you suspect that your pet has consumed antifreeze, please contact us immediately.




Monday, November 26, 2012

Pet Treat Recipe: Pumpkin Ice Bites


Want your dog to have a delicious and safe holiday treat? Here's a simple recipe you can make at home:

Blend 1 cup of canned pumpkin with 1 cup of plain non-fat yogurt and freeze in an ice tray. Dogs can be given these one cube at a time (outside, because they can be a little messy for carpet!). 

This mixture can also be stuffed into a Kong or rubber stuffable toy and frozen. That will allow hours of dog entertainment!

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Sunday is National Take a Hike Day

Thinking of going for a hike this Sunday to celebrate National Take a Hike Day? If you’re bringing your pet, make sure they’re up-to-date on their flea and tick preventative!

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Cats & Car Engines


Did you know that cats often climb under the hood of cars to get warm near the car engine? As the nights are getting cooler, it’s important to be aware of the potential danger to your outdoor cat, as well as any neighbors’ cats. As a courtesy, it’s important to knock on the hood of your car or open it and look inside every morning before you start your car, because you never know who might be lurking inside and in danger.

Friday, October 5, 2012

Halloween Safety Tips


Attention, animal lovers, it's almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying "trick or treat!" all the way to November 1.
1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. If you do suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.
2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them.
3. Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.
4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.
5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don't put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause undue stress.
6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn't annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal's movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.
7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.
8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.
9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn't dart outside.
10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increasing the chances that he or she will be returned to you.


http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/halloween-safety-tips.aspx

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Pets & Hot Pavement

You wouldn't walk on hot pavement without shoes, so think about your pet when you go outside. The black asphalt of streets, parking lots, and some driveways can be so hot that it can burn your pet’s tender footpads. Try to limit your walks to early morning, or always walk where your dog can keep their feet on the grass.

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Pets & Truck Beds


You may sometimes see dogs riding in the beds of pick-up trucks, and it may look like they’re having fun, but it’s extremely dangerous. As pet owners, it’s our job to set boundaries for our pets to ensure their safety. We advise all pet owners to NEVER allow their pet to ride in the back of a pick of truck, as the result could be seriously injury or even death. Be safe! Let your pet ride in the cab with you.


Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Pets & Camping Safety

Camping with your pet can be a fun adventure, but also a dangerous one! It’s important to be fully prepared for bringing a pet with you into the woods BEFORE you go. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on all parasite prevention, and be sure to pack plenty of food and water. If you’re filtering your water, don’t forget your pet needs filtered water too! And most importantly, check campground rules where you’ll be staying, because some campgrounds don’t allow pets because of the danger of large wild animals, like bears! Make sure you keep your pets and family safe, and have a great trip!

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Hiking Safety Tips

Looking to escape your hometown haunts for a wilderness hike? Don't forget your pooch! Dogs love to explore our country's vast natural resources as much their two-legged counterparts—not to mention, hiking is great exercise for all. But remember, a hiking trail isn't your average walk around the block. The ASPCA offers some helpful tips for keeping you and your pet safe and sound on your outdoor adventures.

Extending leashes are great for wide open spaces, but if your romp is taking you through wooded areas, it's best to leave the flexi-leads at home. Otherwise, you'll probably spend more time untangling your dog's leash from trees and brush than you will enjoying your walk!

If your pup is the trustworthy sort and you want to give him the opportunity to enjoy some untethered time on your hike, first make sure that dogs are allowed to be off-leash in the area you're exploring. Second, be sure that he responds reliably to your recall command—even the most obedient dog might bolt after some fascinating new critter.

Hard to believe, but not everyone is as enamored with dogs as we are! Some people get very nervous around unleashed dogs. As a courtesy, have a leash on standby to clip to your dog when encountering other hikers.

Whether you're using a leash or not, don't forget IDs, please! Always make sure that your current contact information, including your cell phone number, is attached to your dog's collar or body harness. If for any reason your pet gets lost, a collar and tags and a microchip will increase the likelihood that he or she will be returned to you.

You never know what you may encounter on a hike—so before setting out into the wilderness, check your pet's veterinary records and make sure his vaccinations are up-to-date.

Training tip: Teach your dog to come to you for treats whenever you pass by other hikers, especially if they have dogs, too. Your dog will learn to not interfere with passersby, and at the same time, you're ensuring he associates new people and dogs with good things, like tasty treats from you.

If a poop falls in the woods and no one else sees it, do you get a free pass? NO! There's no such thing as a victimless poop. Please have respect for your surroundings, native wildlife and fellow hikers by scooping up after your dog and toting the baggie back to civilization if there are no trash cans around.

Both of you need to stay hydrated, so bring enough water for two. Don't allow your pup to drink from puddles, ponds, lakes or streams—in other words, "nature's dog bowls"—as they may contain nasty parasites or toxins that could cause her harm.

When your hike is finished, give your pooch a thorough once-over for ticks and other creepy-crawlies. Pay special attention to her belly, ears, and any skin folds and crevices. If you do spot a tick, treat the area with rubbing alcohol and remove the parasite immediately by slowly pulling it off with tweezers. Be careful when removing a tick, as any contact with its blood can potentially transmit infection to your dog or even to you. Wash the bite area and keep an eye on it for the next few days—if irritation persists, contact your vet.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Pets In Cars

During the hot, summer months, please consider the safety of your pet when you take them for a ride in the car. Remember that even if you’re planning on running into a store for just a minute, it’s too dangerous to leave your pet in the car. Just a few minutes in a car during the summer months can raise the temperature to unbearable levels. Exposure to such extreme heat can result in heatstroke, which can cause brain damage or even death. Leave your pets at home in the air conditioning this summer if it gets too hot.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Pet of the Month: Pebbles

Pebbles is an 81/2 year old Shar Pei that was unfortunate to have a severe disagreement with her housemates. Pebbles was brought to us in shock, severe multiple bite wounds and not using her left hind leg. Pebbles' bite wounds required intensive care and because of the severity for the wounds the tissue became necrotic and had to be removed. After extensive treatment and a prolonged stay in the hospital Pebbles is making a remarkable recovery thanks to the dedication of her owner. Pebbles is such a trooper and a sweetheart. 

She has been steadily and quickly healing and progressing, with fewer bandages and more activity all the time. She has continued to amaze us, and is jumping up on her bed on her own!  Now, she is bandage-free! Her wounds are healing well, and even those that were down to the bone have almost filled in completely. She is playing with toys and rolling in the grass (I've attached pics and a video!), and loving life! 


video

Friday, April 20, 2012

Mobilize the Earth for Earth Day 2012

The first Earth Day, on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life to speak out against the deterioration of the environment and demand change. As a result, the Environmental Protection Agency was created, the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts were passed,and the modern environmental movement was born.

Today, more than 1 billion people in 192 countries participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world. This year, in the face of global inaction on pressing environmental problems, we must harness that power.

Earth Day Network is calling upon individuals, organizations, businesses and governments to Mobilize the Earth™ and demand that environmental issues become a top priority.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Pets & Easter Egg Hunts

Easter egg hunts are so much fun for kids, and sometimes even for adults! Finding that brightly colored egg stuffed with a surprise is exciting! But don't forget the dangers of failing to find an egg that's been stuffed with candy. Your dog leads with their nose, and if you don't find it, your pet might! Consider stuffing your eggs with something safe for pets this year. If Fido finds them, he'll be less likely to break them open and eat what's inside.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Common Pet Toxicity

Did you know that some regular household substances can be poisonous to your pet? It’s important to keep an eye on the things that your pet consumes, and that includes things out in the yard! We suggest keeping your poisonous substances, such as fertilizers, pesticides, paints, and cleaning products on high shelves inside the shed or garage. And be sure to thoroughly clean any spills on the driveway or garage floor. You never know what your pet might get into!
 
 

Thursday, March 1, 2012

March is Poison Prevention Month

March is Poison Prevention Month! Did you know that some of the most common household items that poison pets include human medication, both prescription and over the counter? With over 25,000 reported cases of pets poisoned by eating human medicine, it’s important to exercise extreme caution when it comes to storing these items! Keep your medications high up on shelves and closed inside cabinets, where your pet cannot access them. It’s also important to open bottles over counters so that any dropped pills don’t end up on the floor where they can be snapped up by a curious pet. Keep your pet safe and healthy this March!
 

Friday, January 20, 2012

Pet Apps

These curious creatures love playing with Pet Apps on iPhones and iPads. If you have an iPad or iPhone, do you have any Pet Apps installed on them? If so, which do you recommend for pet owners and their furry family members?


Monday, January 2, 2012

Today is National Pet Travel Safety Day

Today is National Pet Travel Safety Day! The mission of this day is to save lives by creating awareness of the vital need for pet safety in all areas of travel. Safe travels!